Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans

Tech Intersect #19: Bartlett D. Morgan-Data Privacy and Best Practices in the Digital Age for the Caribbean & Beyond

April 24, 2020 Tonya M. Evans Episode 20
Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans
Tech Intersect #19: Bartlett D. Morgan-Data Privacy and Best Practices in the Digital Age for the Caribbean & Beyond
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Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans
Tech Intersect #19: Bartlett D. Morgan-Data Privacy and Best Practices in the Digital Age for the Caribbean & Beyond
Apr 24, 2020 Episode 20
Tonya M. Evans

In this episode of Tech Intersect, I speak with Barlett D. Morgan who shares his perspectives on data privacy in Barbados as well as the Caribbean at large, and key practical steps organizations can and must take to develop and manage robust privacy compliance programs that reflect the realities of a global digital world. We also talk, more generally, about ways for individuals to remain safer when communicating and transacting online. This includes ways to protect your devices and safeguard your data.

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Questions and requests: hello@techintersectpodcast.com

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Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of Tech Intersect, I speak with Barlett D. Morgan who shares his perspectives on data privacy in Barbados as well as the Caribbean at large, and key practical steps organizations can and must take to develop and manage robust privacy compliance programs that reflect the realities of a global digital world. We also talk, more generally, about ways for individuals to remain safer when communicating and transacting online. This includes ways to protect your devices and safeguard your data.

Guest social assets:

Questions and requests: hello@techintersectpodcast.com

Contact:

Want early access to episodes, exclusive content including full show notes, live video chats and replays, a copy of my e-book, The Gen Xers Guide to Upskilling for a Web 3.0 World and self-guided course of the same name? Subscribe to Advantage Evans™ Plus, Advantage Evans Premium™ or Advantage Evans Pro™

~~~~~~~~~

**Get one year FREE PRO membership**

  • VIP “first listen” access 48 hours before the public
  • invitations to free live member-only Tech Intersect Connect™ video chats
  • discounts on webinars and other online content
  • complimentary copy of my forthcoming e-book, The Gen Xers Guide to Upskilling in a Web 3.0 World (coming soon)
  • unlimited access to Tech Intersect Connect™ video chat replays
  • unlimited access to webinars and other online content
  • exclusive access to bonus episodes
  • unlimited access to the self-guided course, The Gen Xers Guide to Upskilling in a Web 3.0 World (coming soon)
  • group coaching calls for life of membership

JOIN NOW

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Links

Support the show (https://techintersectpodcast.com/join/)

spk_1:   0:07
Welcome to Tech Intersect. I'm your host, Tanya Evans, and my life and work exists at the heart of law, business and technology. Yeah, I've earned a few fancy titles in degrees over the years, but the bottom line is I'm a writer, speaker, teacher and lifelong learner, and I'm really excited that you join me on this journey. So what is Tech intersect? Well, it's authentic, empowering conversations with really interesting guests who demystify complex topics to prepare you for the future. Because your future is now and it exists where law, business and tech intersect. Get ready to listen, learn and left change. Let's get

spk_0:   0:50
started in this episode of tech Intersect. I speak with Bartlett D. Morgan, who shares his perspectives on data privacy in Barbados as well as the Caribbean at large, and shares key practical steps that organisations can and must take to develop and manage robust privacy compliance programs that reflect the realities of a global digital world. We also talked more generally about ways for individuals to remain safer when communicating and transacting online, and this includes ways to protect your devices and safeguard your data. You know what time it is time to listen, learn and leverage. So let's get started. Bartlett D. Morgan is a lawyer and an Internet policy specialist. He's a senior associate in the Barbados office at Lex. Caribbean, and his areas of practice include commercial litigation, restructuring and insolvency, just to name a few. His professional interest include data protection I p. Disputes digital media and telecom. It's an honor and true pleasure to have you on the show today, Bartlett. So welcome.

spk_2:   2:00
Oh, thank you very much, Tanya. It's really a pleasure for me to be here.

spk_0:   2:05
Excellent. I'm so glad that our Twitter lives connected in an amazing way. And we're now not exactly in real life but more real life than Twitter. Real life. So, um, e followed your work and really excited to learn more from you and more about all the exciting and innovative things in data privacy and protection going on in the Caribbean at large. But in Barbados in particular. And where I want to start is and I asked this of all of my guests in various ways about your origin story. So your background is really interesting. I've read up, but I want you to share that with the listeners for your background, your expertise. And I think we can both agree your very healthy obsession privacy. Talk to me about that. Had it eso talk to me. What's your origin story?

spk_2:   2:59
So I mean, professionally, I am. I'm actually from Jamaica. I live in Barbados. No, but I'm from Jamaica, which is, like, half way across the Caribbean on, uh, while they're my first professional life had nothing to do with love. I was actually in information technology, you know, particularly I t in higher education. They work at a university on. So that was that always sort of, You know, um, sort of fostered my own interest in technology and applying technology to solve problems. That kind of a thing. Uh, so eventually I realized that I love technology, but my real interest was from the perspective of policy on, you know, shaping the laws and the framework in which you apply the technology. And so I went off to law school to study law on a Ah, After studying law, I landed at LAX Caribbean, which is where I am now. It's a regional law firm. Ah, And there Barbados office eso jumped up. Move countries on. So as a professional, I've always wants to find ways to sort of connect my different interest technology with law and policy. So over the years as a lot, even though my strict practice areas initially was really just typical, you know, litigation, restructuring, employment, that kind of a thing. Over time, I've managed to find a way to sort of like Melvin, both in terms of my legal work and even outside. Um, initially, I was involved with technology and policy because of my work in the Internet governance space. So I involved for like, a few years in ah, I can, which is the Internet corporation for assigned names and numbers. Basically, they're one of those organizations that help to make sure that Internet works we don't need to get into the details, but it's really a great, true and grown for seeing technology policy, like evolve over time and get shaped by multiple persons and that kind of thing s O. That was really great for me, but professionally over time because I've always been interested in both technology. Adlon held the Intersect with the natural talking points over the past, maybe 45 years in the Caribbean has been privacy and how that fits into everything we're doing, you know, commercially in just in terms of the everyday lives of people that kind of a thing. So initially it wasn't necessarily professional in the sense of being paid to do it. This was just pure curiosity, right? Read in trying to understand. And each time you read something else, go Wow, this is amazing on I don't know about other persons, but for me, if I really want to learn something, well, I tend to put myself of the gun. So I am like, write an article which puts me, You know, it opens me up to the public gaze because obviously, if you get it wrong when someone's gonna say, Hey, you're rock with that sort of ah yes threat or over my head I said, Let's start doing that. So obviously I'd have to be well researched. So I started reading more understanding, more talking to board persons into space network in on. They also started talking about what I'd learned on eventually that sort of transformed from just sort of intellectual pursuit to clients starting to ask questions as the environment started to change Maurin the Caribbean with the laws changing and that kind of thing.

spk_0:   6:15
Absolutely. And as you describe your you know, that's that rabbit hole experience where you fall down the rabbit hole, you learn something that leads to 10 more questions that lead to 20 more answers and so on and so forth. And also trying to find the connection to things that you may already due to see how that fits in and makes sense for you. And so I very much had the same path in Blockchain crypto assets distributed ledger technology. I originally was looking at it when I certainly fell down the rabbit hole and didn't come up for about 30 days. I watched everything I could on YouTube. I read everything. You know, I'm a lifelong learner, and I hear that in your story as well. To really get under the hood and figure things out. Oh, you know. So that makes a lot of sense

spk_2:   7:03
to me. Absolutely. Um, you know, I I'm definitely a believer in life, long learning. It's not just something you do in the ivory towers of an academic institution. It should be part and parcel of your life. You know, there's this thing that I was told I remember when I just started practicing law There is this all the life was said to be No knowledge is ever wasted right at the time. What do you mean now? They just never wasted. I mean, if I'm a specialist, invest and I only need to know about this, you know, you hope young lawyers are with time and experience. I've come to appreciate the wisdom of what he's saying, No matter whole narrow. That knowledge is that you picked up in some random please do some random thing. At some point, it may become useful. It may become a useful tool in your professional arsenal, depend on where you end up. So definitely I've taken that approach to how I prefer, Ah, deal with things professionally and how I try to devote myself.

spk_0:   7:55
That's fantastic. And you certainly have become an expert in this field. So let's talk about your data privacy work in the Caribbean in general, Barbados in particular. I as I read up in preparation for the interview and and certainly knowing what's going on in the broader landscape globally that privacy rules of affecting all businesses. But certainly Caribbean businesses are becoming stricter. And and in some sense legislators and regulators may be facing the headwinds of regulations in other places. When you have GPR, GRP Excuse me, um, and some of the other things going on which led to Or maybe you'll tell us, Ah, the origin of the Barbados Data Protection Act and and how that came to be and why. So talk to us about those key initiatives and then we'll get to some other practical steps

spk_2:   8:48
this later. Sure, so like, there are number of things going on in the Caribbean space. So, like just like Lee, I'd see the the framework or the lay of the land in maybe 11 years ago of all the countries in the Caribbean, depending how you define Caribbean, because the definition very angry speaking and talking Caricom carry forum. All these things have different definitions, but in the me, in prior to maybe 10 years ago, only perhaps two countries off potentially 20 plus countries had actual meaningful data privacy laws, things like the Bahamas and ST Vincent. We back it like in the early two thousands. They both passed privacy laws. Uh, it was just like absolute silence in the region for years. But then, in the past 10 years or so, a number off jurisdictions have just been passing laws. Passing Loves writing Center, Trinidad, Barbados recently said Lucia, Antigua and Jamaica is about to pass. Suriname is looking to fires. A number of jurisdictions have been passing laws. The Dominica rip public, you name it. And so there's almost been almost something off in a weakening on XCom, more less from two from as the external and internal sort of push factors so externally, lots of the Caribbean jurisdictions are party to. This trade arrangement with Europe is called the E. P. A. On the that means economic partnership agreement. And one of the terms of that agreement was that essentially all the parties had to sign on to our agreed to pass privacy laws in their different jurisdictions in the Caribbean. And so this was something they agreed toe. They had a certain timeframe within which they had to do it. And so, in order to be in compliance, lots of jurisdictions started passing laws. That was one of the reasons, but I think just even outside of that. I think many jurisdictions the governments have sort of become aware of the reality that they have their own digital agendas for their countries. Because I think it's fairly clear to everyone know that unless you're development agenda includes an element of the digital in transition and services and so on online and getting your people online and being fully equipped to live full lives with a digital extension, At very least then you're pretty much failing the people you serve. And so I think, even within the jurisdictions themselves, there has been a recognition that they need to have a framework in, please, for lowing persons and businesses and processes to transition online on a big part of that. Free markets privacy on again Forgive me from for being perhaps a bit academic, but the reality is there's kind of like almost formula, which is privacy, and a privacy framer tends to the need to trust, uh, you know, on a number of levels, trust in the sense that, well, if something goes wrong, there's some kind of recourse. You know, if you take my personal data, you Bridget, there's some kind, of course, that kind of a thing is important. In addition to that, there's trust in that. Well, if you're putting all this effort into securing my data, then I trust your product and I'll want to engage with your product. Whatever that is, you're up your cooling website. Whatever it is, I'm more likely to want to engage with it if you you have built privacy into that product offering eso all these factors have been, I think, impacting the kind of landscape we have. No in the Caribbean, you could even zone in, perhaps on Barbados, where we've recently passed an act on it is on the face of it. It's very similar to what you'd see in the GDP are out of the European Union in terms of a lot of the rights on the you know, the time frames on the processes involved. It's very, very similar. And I think that speaks to sort of a general just awareness of best practices in our predictions. And, you know, the truth is the Europeans, they're sort of like the Trail Blazers for privacy on, you know, reason. I think the importance of privacy in all aspects of our lives. They've had you know something of, Ah, you could see almost unhealthy obsession, you know, for many decades. Given their unique history and sod, I think that's led to them, you know, taking the lead and passing comprehensive privacy laws back decades in some jurisdictions in the European Union. And so they've had lots of experience with what works and what doesn't work. So when they came with the GDP are one of things you noticed that lots of other jurisdictions around the world on even states in the US have sort of taken cues from the GDP are in terms of the best practices that can be adopted, you know, in their local circumstances. So, for example, this concept of me and full extra territoriality is this thing that we talk about in privacy circles all the time. Which basically means although you passed your laws with an X country, it could potentially apply to someone outside of your country dependent what they're doing. All right, The GDP are made that a big deal on so lots of companies in us and the Caribbean everywhere to started paying attention, especially when they retreated. Are you provide services into Europe? Andi. So we've seen adoption of features like that in the Barbados Act on lots of other things. Things like, you know, sharp time for him to breach notification, which is basically, you're running the business. Something has gone around with the data. There's been a breach, you know, off some sort of the other on, you know, you have no have a time for him within which you have to tell the regulator that something has gone wrong. And this is like, right, three days we're talking, you know, which is freely sharp, which tells you hopes how seriously they're taken. The issue of privacy and protecting Ethan and limited negative follows from data, preaches that kind of a thing. And so what you would notice with the barbarous act is actually a wider trend in the entire Caribbean, which is the more recent acts are very much similar to to the GDP. Are there similar stuff you see in the CCP? A out of California, that kind of a thing. And so that's pretty much how we've I say got me here in terms of the kind of legislation you're seeing in the jurisdictions. No. Yes,

spk_0:   15:08
that's fantastic. And it also speaks to this idea of governments moving too smart status. And I know that you recently wrote about this transition. I know that you had a great deal to do with marking up the bill that is now an act and in some of your writings recently, you explain that Barbados is moving to advance a digital development agenda and and that this is an integral part and parcel of that. And central to this effort is Ah, you may have mentioned a bit ago. Is this idea of an appropriate consumer protection framework? And this is an essential part of that. This might be the backbone if we're really talking about, ah framework, rape. So the passage of the comprehensive data protection legislation that is critical to the effort but talking to listeners ah, bit more about what that means. You've touched on on some of that, but also why Barbados in particular, is so invested in this transition.

spk_2:   16:06
So here's might see I a few, let's say, a year and 1/2 ago, uh, the there in national elections and a new government came into power on were the first things they did was to announce a specialized ministry on one of the things that is specialized ministry would deal with with not just technology but smart technology like that's literally a part of the need which tells you everything about the agenda and the direction that the barbarous government is going in, right? No, on. I think that is in large part in in cognizance of the reality of certainly small island developing states on the reality that we don't have huge resources to thrown to, you know, fit different changes in the global economy and so on. And so we we don't necessarily have lots of raw materials that we could trade and export in that kind of thing. And so a lot of her value is in services. This is 2020. Most services are being delivered or mediated digitally. It made absolute sense that in that context that you'd want to pass legislation that kind of lays down that sort of ah sort of framework to a low people toe a little businesses that were comfortably go about this thing which is necessary, which is getting your people online, but in a safe way. Uh, and in a way where people feel vested and comfortable in changing their practices from doing everything manually to doing it digitally, right? Yeah, Did reality is the way we need the Internet, you know, modern technologies for a number of things, education and connecting with family and friends access in meaningful resources. And so if you managed to lay a meaningful framework for and people feel comfortable doing those things, then half of the battle is won in terms of transition and your people online. So I think that was, I think, really phenomenal that they've taken this sort of approach to ensure that the overall framer consumer framework is adapted to the digital age on. So you'll see that reflected in the legislation the privacy legislation, even the generic, you know, consumer rights legislation that's already in place. It's sort of it's more less, I'd say, technology agnostic. And so, even though it's not necessarily specifically for the Internet, it's so broad and so crafted that it comforted covers a lot of situations that consumers will find themselves in. When you were doing business online, you're buying stuff online, that kind of a thing,

spk_0:   18:44
right? Well, let's talk about that some more, because that leads to a discussion around data extraction and collection by private companies, certainly by governments and, of course, the bad actors of the world as well. And that's you know, that data extraction and collection is a primary focus, given the value that we all speak about of data, of course, being the new oil, as it were said, there so many areas in places and countries that don't actively manufacture things. As you mentioned, we're focused very much on services and services that are driven and implemented online, and that's certainly having an impact on an individual's ability to navigate and avoid mitigate the biggest dangers and challenges when interacting and transacting on the Internet. So let's talk about something that you recently shared as well, and I love this very much. I will drop this in the show notes. It was a 2020 privacy checkup. Then we've got to some key areas of four recommendations. I list them and weaken unpack them a little bit together. But the four recommendations of being safer I don't know you could ever be truly safe, but certainly be proactive in terms of being safer as a consumer. So the four steps that were mentioned. Get a password manager, do a cleanup of online accounts. Don't use the public Internet without a VPN, and I certainly swear by that on, and particularly as much as I travel. But you don't have to travel far for that to be an issue and then avoid most I, O. T. Or Internet of Things devices. I just had a very good discussion about that with Alan Silberberg, who's a cyber security expert. Um, out drop a link to that episode in the show notes as well. But let's talk about that password managers Cleanup of online accounts, VP ends and sexually from the i O Tee. Alexa, don't listen anymore. Turn yourself off and go out of this house. I don't want to ring. I don't want anything. I want everything out of cells. Talk

spk_2:   20:57
to me. Absolutely so the I mean let must be, Is it? Privacy has to be practical. First of all, you know, it has to be a practical thing before anything. Els Andi, I think in that way, you know you have to take practical steps to actually secure your privacy. You know, this isn't just about, you know, government passing legislation I mean, So what if if your government passes of laws that says, OK, well, you know, you did it should be protected. Just because it should be doesn't mean it is all right. It also doesn't divorce you from your responsibilities to do your part to protect your data. So in the man, this whole, I'd have a password manager. I think it really just falls in line with the reality of the world we live in in 2020. Going forward, much more of what we do in our lives. Every day is mediated by the Internet, you know, on right by digital devices and services. And naturally, you know, most persons will know as a first step provide some kind of security mechanism where you can provide credentials of some sort, maybe a password or what have you on. So then you can access services. But the reality is, with all these services, an increasing number of services that are no online, what it means is the average human being. You can't remember that stuff on writing them down on a list somewhere that you keep by your desk. It's probably a really bad idea, you know, I mean, no judgment, but it's probably not the best idea. You wasn't aside. The truth is, I think like if you wanted most persons, the truth is most persons even persons in the private space will tell you I've been down a password here and there on my desk. Absolutely. You know, if there I'll just be real here. But the truth is, they there are practical ways to manage this new reality. And a password manager, I think, is one of them, You know, whether it's ah, passed back or last past or any of these other key past any of these other popular absence software titles out there for protecting your passwords and storing them in one place. I think it's a great idea because you no longer have to worry about knowing every single password for all the different services that you use, especially if you're trying to do the right thing and have different passwords for the different services you know. So then it's just a practical step. Once you've gotten different passwords to ensure that you can remember them on that, you can rise them in a meaningful way, so essentially know the password manager. You just need one password that you will use to access your password manager. Once you're in, then you're able to quickly and easily access all your different Web services. You're working meal your home, email your Facebook, your instagram, your twitter, your you know, whatever it is you're doing online, you know, all the different cool, absolute coming out that you want to try out least now you can do it in a more secure way without having to worry every single time we tried to Iraq your brain every single time. Okay,

spk_1:   23:47
way. Hope you're enjoying this edition of tech intersect. Our conversation will continue in a moment, but first, a word on an exciting opportunity. The tech Intersect podcast is released to the public every Friday, but as an advantage Evans member, you'll receive first listen. Access and live tech Intersect Connect Video Chance Premium members also receive a copy of my book, the Gen Xers Guy to up Skilling in a Web three point on world and unlimited access to the video chat replays and bonus episodes. My pro members ready to leverage what they listen to and learn, receive access, toothy up, Skilling self guided course and V. I P Group coaching calls. So as you can see advantage, Evans membership adds substantial value to your podcast experience, and there are three ways to take advantage. See what I did right there of all that detect Intersect podcast has to offer. So subscribe now and let's listen, learn and leverage together. And now, back to the conversation.

spk_0:   25:02
I've seen this actually benefit families if someone, unfortunately passes on Oh yes, and the ability to manage digital assets to gain easier access to account information and the necessary things of winding up estates. And that could be an important reason for people to to look into password managers as well. I'll have some additional advice about the specific ones that you listed and how to properly vet what might be the best one for you. But I really do think that one of the most important things we can do is to have a password manager in place. Yes, on got a sticky note that

spk_2:   25:43
that's right, like there's really good. A good illustration of, you know, having some kind of manager that hopefully, in theory, some other trusted person could perhaps access in the worst case scenario. You know, there is this case, I think, in the Blockchain space, you know, Karen for the name of the company that was involved, but essentially, it was behind it. He passed on, um, and then essentially, nobody could access the resources that the that he had provided, you know, first, you know, I think you know, I'm not sure exactly what it was, but I remember coming across a hidden going. My goodness. You know, this could have really been avoided if there was at least one trusted person. Are, you know, some trusted persons, You know, whether you lie your or maybe a close family member who at least have access to maybe a password manager. Some like that. We could in a worst case scenario to go. Okay, well, here's what this is. You know, that's what an entire business wouldn't have to die because, right, what happened In that case,

spk_0:   26:38
Yes. That's the Quadra ca si x case. Yes, and about 100 90 million or so. But he's helping everybody who lost money through that. Ah, and that is an ongoing concern. That's actually a very interesting story. I will drop that in the Schoenholtz. It's well, all right, That's password manager. So and I was thinking of this idea of the next one cleaning up online accounts. And some of that is, you know, oftentimes, when people sign up for social media, Facebook is the most glaring example that, you know, I grew up in a time where you opt, you know you have the presumption of privacy, even though it probably is was a faux presumption. We just wasn't as connected at that time, and then you would opt into an experience for the benefits that a particular online platform would have in terms of connection. But every picture every I'm here now. I met the coffee shop right now, and when we come to learn that signalling and in fact I travel a lot. But I almost never post a picture of where I am in the moment. It's always looking back. By the time people see my awesome vacation pictures, I am long gone, I assure I what

spk_2:   27:53
similar as well, you know, I don't pull us lots of information about well, certainly not time sensitive information less I have to. You won't necessarily learn anything about life family life or home life going even on my social media pages. You know, because I'm more mindful No, ho. The information you put out there can impact. You know, the ability of office to triangulate on, figure out, are the details of your life without you being complicity in that process or be in any part of that process. And so for me, I think clean your house did Shelly is like one of those routine things you ought to do from time to time, because here's the reality. Most persons nowadays, I mean, you're not gonna necessarily create like a fresh you password for every single website you're on ideal, your perhaps showed, but most persons usually you go the easy route, which is lucky and via Facebook or logging and fire. You know, your Gmail account or something like that, because it's just easy. But then there are lots of problems that can come from that you know, when you've used them service because it was really cool and trendy. But then, six years later, nobody's on their You've forgotten a voted, but guess what? You still gave it access, you know, to some of your other resources that you use in the game and that kind of thing. Perhaps your Facebook and what have you done, depending the nature of actually gave it? It can continue to like you collect information from you on. What happens when that third party service that's no longer popular cool, gets hacked, then potentially has access to some of your data there that kind of thing on. So it's important, I think, generally, just always do these checks to go. Okay, well, what am I not using anymore? My disconnect that from my ecosystem of digital services, so to speak, you know, So it no longer has access to these other things which themselves may ask me to access to other digital services You never know. And so it's important just to do that check every now and again fairly routinely, you know, I mean, cleaning hosted chili for me also means things like routinely changing certain passwords, the things that you know, who was the data that's, like, very fundamental to me. I try. I mean again, we feel all the time we're human beings, but I certainly try to, for example, change certain passwords on a routine shed you so that, you know, even if there is some kind of a breach and someone does have access to, you know, they managed to, you know, breaking some website and crack into the database, and they unhatched everything they could see. Okay, user name, password. Hopefully, by the time they've got that data, I've changed my passwords. And really So that information they have on these obsolete is practical stuff like that. I even goes like this stuff we've talked about generally, which is a mean in terms of, you know, your traditional hosts. Look at the information that's publicly available because this isn't necessarily about some seven if Iris guy in the back room hacking away and trying cracked passwords and stuff. Sometimes it's social. It's persons look at your social media, but ah, you're here. Well, you're not home, right? You know, it's really just like objective and auditing home. You appear in the information you share about your life online, and it's being mindful love that I'm not getting kind of sucked into this idea of wanting to share everything. I mean, transparency is great, but when done mindfully

spk_0:   31:05
right, because it can come at a cost. And, yes, you're constantly weighing and assessing risks. But sometimes you don't even know what is lurking just behind you. Take some reasonable precautions, but you never know what's operating in the background. And sometimes for a private company or government, there's a hacking. Other times there's we've opted into permissions that we didn't read and don't understand about their ability to then sell that information and monetize it in certain ways. We've seen that as an example with Cambridge, Analytica and Facebook, and and so there are a lot of times where you don't know what you've given up and end platforms like Facebook, that you actually have to opt in to privacy, and they make it very difficult to Upton to privacy. There 17 steps in order to do that. So be mindful of the cleanup. You can also moving on to the third never use a public Internet without a VPN. So I think again, the travel example is a good one or the coffee shop example, of course, in an airport or in a coffee shop or in a public space where you have public WiFi always having this virtual private network, which enables you to send and receive data while remaining anonymous and secure online. So talk about the benefits of

spk_2:   32:28
that. Well, I mean, it's it's almost I probably shouldn't say it's self evident because perhaps it's not to a lot of people because people don't do it. But the idea is, if you're in a public network, the kind you access probably especially the kinds that don't require plasterers and the kind of thing you could just hop on quickly. Urine Airport. You're in a public space ally, agree. You know you know you name it. Then odds are the ability for bad actors toe access that network and by extension, pay attention on extract the data that's passing along that network. It's a lot easier, potentially and so if you use public networks than you increase the risk that your data could be intercepted by third parties, who could then use that for all kinds of different purposes that are obviously not in your interest. And so it makes sense to create some kind of mechanism that Shiels what you're doing in terms of the websites your axe in and that kind of thing, the emails they're checking from unwanted third parties viewing that information on. That's what the VP and still the VPN is a virtual private network. And it's a really good mechanism for doing just that. No, actually, here's where it gets really funny, because what was the other day? I was on a public network and I try to run. My VPN wouldn't know my VPN to connect, so I disconnected. The whole thing is that it's not worth it. Eso Eventually you started talking to some colleagues in I t. And what they've been explained to me is that lots off public networks no, are more and more public networks. Nowadays, they are actually prevented V p INTs because it no creates a situation where ah, bad actor may legitimately Logan on, then use a VPN to prevent anybody, including the person running, admit the network, the public WiFi from seeing that they're actually trying to, you know, funnel information, you know, within ah particular network that that, you know, public WiFi is associated with that kind of a thing. And so no excreting situation where persons are no preventing VPN access. So this is the interest in sort of the new scenario that we haven't quite figured out. Well, what's the best way to deal with situations like that? Beyond simply saying, Well, I'm just not going to use that particular public network that won't allow me to use a VPN right now we're starting an interesting development, I think persons to be mindful of, you know, just because you've gotten a VPN and yet you put yourself in about yes, I'm doing the privacy thing that, you know, My I t guy told me to do that may not be enough. So, you know, I have to be mindful of inch of ensuring that your VPN actually does connect properly because then otherwise, you know, you maybe run the risk of thinking you're you're secure and transferring information security. But you're actually not. Yes, that's definitely interested One.

spk_0:   35:14
Wow, that is a lot to unpack. So do your homework. Do your own research, as we say, to make sure that you are protected on what your options are in terms of utilizing VP ends. And finally I o. T. Is what I also refer to as o m g. I think of all of the ways that we are transitioning from Web 2.0, which really allowed peer to peer connections and a more dynamic interaction with content were not just passive recipients in Web two point of information, but also content creators. And, you know, we have more of a de centralized or distributed Web, not the Blockchain distributed Web, but certainly more distributed. And as we usher in Web 3.0 with, among other things, you know, when I think of artificial intelligence and machine learning, certainly Blockchain just one of the things that impacts people. Excuse me the most. The Internet of things Iot t all of the devices that are smart, a word that we used earlier. We have smart lights and cameras and locks and thermostats and garage doors. Speakers God help us. Washing machines evidently want to talk to each other. They don't want to talk to the vacuum cleaner and refrigerators want to talk to I don't know who, right and, of course, smart TVs and the ultimate That's not just, you know, not just around the corner. It's now smart cars, right? We have the test was of the world and everything short of that. So these devices are communicating with each other and transmitting data. They're incredibly vulnerable to attacks. It's a lesson a little time talking about I o. T. And avoiding them and why we might want to avoid them.

spk_2:   37:01
So I o. T devices, you know, duality as they are no part and parcel of the landscape that were already like you mentioned from your refrigerator, your car, you name it all kinds of devices in all kinds of different circumstances. Those cute little devices from Google Or, you know, Amazon. You can say, Hey, you know what's the temperature outside or whatever or, you know, you know, play me some good music. There are genetically coyote devices, Internet of things, devices on DA. And so the reality of these devices and why I think there's something of a security risk in many cases is to ensure that they work in as many different circumstances as possible, I guess, sort of to almost idiot proof them ensure that whoever the consumer is that their duty device actually works. Why that tends to translate to practically is that not as much. Security is actually big into these products, and so are, if any at all, And so essentially you just have what most want open device. Just sitting there on the Internet on one I think you come to appreciate with time is that if your device is wide open, it's just a matter of time before some bad actor realizes it's there and tries to use it for some purpose beyond what it was designed to do. On a good example of that is things like, I mean, most persons have probably heard of things like a but it attack all right. Essentially, where, you know, a bad actor has essentially quietly captured a bunch of devices and then used all of these devices on mass to essentials and lots of traffic to a target to essentially, for example, usual. Example. Shut down the website on de so unwittingly because your device your I O T. Device, has no meaningful security baked into it. It means that your device that you bought, which you think is really awesome and it probably is it's no unwittingly part and parcel off that button it Andi, obviously that's a negative. But even outside of that, I mean, obviously it opens the possibility that if you have a devices within your home that can do things like Listen, you know, transmit information from within your personal space. Is it means then that about after could, for example, use that device to listen? The end onto your conversations have a sense of who you are. And again, that's enough ourselves. A huge security breach on DSO you want to in situations where the security framework is not as mature is yet to perhaps hold back. Right now, unless you've satisfied yourself that that device is fairly solid, you probably mean I want to just jump on the hype train just so things tend to work, nobody's

spk_0:   39:45
absolutely. And I think people rely, you know, back to the one of the other words you mentioned and connections this connection between privacy and trust and the goodwill that is built up in a lot of legacy companies or famous marks around the world. There's the assumption and presumption that it's coming from this corporation. It's a worldwide brand. It must be safe, and your queen is. It's giving you the opportunity to connect and interact in meaningful ways without the back end support of the security that we would expect that that type of company would would provide. And so it's good that we continue to have conversations like this to raise consumer awareness because, as you also said, we can pass all the laws and have all the regulations for consumer protection in the world. But if we are also as consumers, not proactive, we leave ourselves vulnerable in those gaps in spaces where regs and legislation just can't go. Yes, absolutely. So we could go on all day. I just looked up and I don't want to take a penny more of your valuable time. And this is an info rich and really wonderful conversation about some really important and interesting things. I want to make sure that listeners can continue to connect with you and your work. So please tell them how they can do

spk_2:   41:10
that. So to keep up with me and what I'm thinking about what I'm doing, you could visit my website, which is Bartlett morgan dot com. B a r t l e t t dot com, or you can find me on Twitter, which is act Bartlett Morgan.

spk_0:   41:27
Excellent. Thank you so much for the work that you are doing and for sharing your expertise in this wonderful conversation today and I will see you on the twitterverse. Yes,

spk_2:   41:38
thank you so much for having me. It's really been a pleasure being here today.

spk_1:   41:44
Many thanks to Bartlett Morgan for sharing all

spk_0:   41:47
of this forward thinking and important data privacy work going on in the Caribbean. Barbados in particular, privacy rules affecting Caribbean businesses are becoming stricter and facing the headwinds of regulations, most notably the Barbados Data Protection Act. So it's really important to stay abreast of the key initiatives and the practical steps for Caribbean organizations to develop and to manage robust privacy compliance programs. And central to this effort for Barbados and all countries really is an appropriate consumer protection framework and something for us all. Be sure to check out the 2020 privacy checkup and follow the four recommendations a sap piddly like right now, like I or Rita, get a password manager, clean up your online accounts. Don't use public Internet without a VPN like ever and avoid most i o T Internet of things devices. And finally, the Phoenix Rising Virtual Summit I mentioned in the last episode was Ah, mazing. We had stellar keynotes and speakers. Minda Hearts, the author of the memo. Money Coach Limit Cal Funny Cox and a surprise guest, Arlen Hamilton, author of It's About Damn Time and founder of Backstage Capital. They all shared strategies and actionable steps on how to crisis proof, your career, your money and your mind. It's really evergreen information information that you can come back to time and again. So we've made available for immediate unlimited streaming access the entire summit and fireside Q and A. Originally that was valued at $99. It will be on Lee $50 you have Lifetime 24 73 65 Access Visit Phoenix Rising Summit that come to get started Crisis proof Your future today.

spk_1:   43:40
Okay, that's all. For now until next time, stay well, be encouraged and continue to shine. Stay in touch with host Tanya Evans via your favorite social media on Twitter at at Tech Intersect and on Instagram via the handle tech intersect. This by cast has been produced by Stephanie Renee for Soul Sanctuary, Incorporated