Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans

Tech Intersect #21: Chanda Prescod-Weinstein-An unapologetically dope conversation about astrophysics, identity and feminism

May 08, 2020 Tonya M. Evans Episode 21
Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans
Tech Intersect #21: Chanda Prescod-Weinstein-An unapologetically dope conversation about astrophysics, identity and feminism
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Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans
Tech Intersect #21: Chanda Prescod-Weinstein-An unapologetically dope conversation about astrophysics, identity and feminism
May 08, 2020 Episode 21
Tonya M. Evans

In this episode, I welcome Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Core Faculty Member in Women’s Studies at the University of New Hampshire. She is also a columnist for New Scientist. Her work exists at the intersection of particle physics and astrophysics.

She is primarily a theoretical researcher, but has deep knowledge of, and connection to, observational astronomy. Essence Magazine recognized her as one of 15 Black Women Who Are Paving the Way in STEM and Breaking Barriers.

Her work has been featured in several venues, including Huffington Post, Gizmodo, Nylon, and the African-American Intellectual History Society. And in 2017, she received the LGBT+ Physicists Acknowledgement of Excellence Award for Years of Dedicated Effort in Changing Physics Culture to be More Inclusive and Understanding Toward All Marginalized Peoples.

Guest social assets

Transcription: COMING SOON!

Advantage Evans Members: Full Show Notes and Bonus Material 

Contact:

Questions and requests: hello@techintersectpodcast.com 

Follow: Twitter @AtTechIntersect Instagram @TechIntersect 

Web: http://www.TechIntersectPodcast.com  

Mailing List: http://eepurl.com/gKqDyP 

Want early access to episodes, exclusive content including full show notes, live video chats and replays, a copy of my e-book, The Gen Xers Guide to Upskilling for a Web 3.0 World and self-guided course of the same name? Subscribe to Advantage Evans™ Plus, Advantage Evans Premium™ or Advantage Evans Pro™: https://techintersectpodcast.com/advantage-evans/ 

Rapternal Music (Regulate and The Rabbit Hole) by Notty Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Produced by Tonya Evans for FYOS Entertainment, LLC, and Stephanie Renee for Soul Sanctuary, Inc.

Support the show (https://techintersectpodcast.com/join/)

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, I welcome Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Core Faculty Member in Women’s Studies at the University of New Hampshire. She is also a columnist for New Scientist. Her work exists at the intersection of particle physics and astrophysics.

She is primarily a theoretical researcher, but has deep knowledge of, and connection to, observational astronomy. Essence Magazine recognized her as one of 15 Black Women Who Are Paving the Way in STEM and Breaking Barriers.

Her work has been featured in several venues, including Huffington Post, Gizmodo, Nylon, and the African-American Intellectual History Society. And in 2017, she received the LGBT+ Physicists Acknowledgement of Excellence Award for Years of Dedicated Effort in Changing Physics Culture to be More Inclusive and Understanding Toward All Marginalized Peoples.

Guest social assets

Transcription: COMING SOON!

Advantage Evans Members: Full Show Notes and Bonus Material 

Contact:

Questions and requests: hello@techintersectpodcast.com 

Follow: Twitter @AtTechIntersect Instagram @TechIntersect 

Web: http://www.TechIntersectPodcast.com  

Mailing List: http://eepurl.com/gKqDyP 

Want early access to episodes, exclusive content including full show notes, live video chats and replays, a copy of my e-book, The Gen Xers Guide to Upskilling for a Web 3.0 World and self-guided course of the same name? Subscribe to Advantage Evans™ Plus, Advantage Evans Premium™ or Advantage Evans Pro™: https://techintersectpodcast.com/advantage-evans/ 

Rapternal Music (Regulate and The Rabbit Hole) by Notty Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Produced by Tonya Evans for FYOS Entertainment, LLC, and Stephanie Renee for Soul Sanctuary, Inc.

Support the show (https://techintersectpodcast.com/join/)

spk_0:   0:07
Welcome to Tech Intersect. I'm your host, Tanya Evans, and my life and work exists at the heart of law, business and technology. Yeah, I've earned a few fancy titles in degrees over the years, but the bottom line is I'm a writer, speaker, teacher and lifelong learner, and I'm really excited that you join me on this journey. So what is Tech intersect? Well, it's authentic, empowering conversations with really interesting guests who demystify complex topics to prepare you for the future. Because your future is now and it exists where law, business and tech intersect. Get ready to listen, learn and left change. Let's get started. In this episode, I welcome Dr Chanda Prescott Weinstein. She's an assistant professor of physics and astronomy and core faculty member in women's studies at the University of New Hampshire. She's also a columnist for New Scientist, and her work exists at the intersection of particle physics and astrophysics. She's primarily a theoretical researcher but has deep knowledge of and connection to observation ALS astronomy. Essence magazine recognized her as one of 15 black women who are paving the way in stem and breaking barriers. Her work has been featured in several venues, including the Huffington Post, his Moto nylon, an African American intellectual history Society. And in 2017 she received the LGBT Plus Physicists Acknowledgement of Excellence award. I'm so excited about this episode because not only do I have a great deal of admiration and respect for Dr Prescott Weinstein, she's also a colleague at UNH. So I look forward to sharing her with some introducing her to others. Time to listen, learn and leverage. Let's get started. I'm thrilled to welcome an engaging educator, a phenomenal physicist, an unapologetic feminist and a dear colleague, Dr Chanda Prescott Weinstein, to tech intersect. I asked her to join me to answer. I don't know some really easy questions like where we come from and how we fit into the greater galactic ALS system and and whether Wauconda actually exists. That should only take a few minutes, and then we'll delve into the topic of inclusion and equity in the stem space. And also her forthcoming book, The Disordered Cosmos. Ah popular science Book, which draws from her experience and knowledge, is a black woman theoretical physicist Dr Prescott Weinstein. Welcome.

spk_1:   2:50
Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be talking to you.

spk_0:   2:53
I feel like we're ships passing in the night and Twitter and online. I'm a real person in your real person and someday we'll be in the same space at the same time. But I admire you and from a far and near and really thrilled to have this combo with you for so many different reasons. But first, I love for you to share with the listeners your origin story. And what led you to pursue a life path in physics and astronomy, even what the study entails, and, most importantly, why it makes your heart sing. Because I know you love it very, very much. So talk about your origin story and in all of that.

spk_1:   3:32
So I guess I'm from a fairly young age. I was pretty excited about doing math like I was the dorky kid He sat around after school writing at her times tables over never gun like for my own entertainment. Nice. And I got I'm introduced to science for the first time. When I was in fifth grade, when I was 10 and became clear, I was excited by a physical science type. Things like the ideas behind why plane staying the error like how they managed to fly in that kind of thing. So my mom, I was raised by a single mom. She took me to go see a matinee of Errol Morris's film A Brief History of Time, which is a documentary that Stephen Hawking has the name. The same name is the famous book by Stephen Hawking popular Science Book. And halfway through the film, I was like, Wait, wait, wait. You can get paid to do math that tells you about the universe and we'll answer questions that Einstein was unable to answer in his lifetime. Like this is a career path on. And I was like, This is what I want to dio because I was just like So I get to do math for the rest of my life and I get to answer these amazing questions that Einstein ants was trying to answer, and if I might stay in thought, it was an important question. It's an important question. So I walked out of the movie theater age ton, begging my mom for a copy of the book, and my mom didn't get it for me because she was afraid. I would become discouraged trying to read this adult popular science. But and so her older brother bought it for me for my 11th birthday. And that's, I guess, the beginning.

spk_0:   5:04
Well, that's tremendous. And I love that you you recognized your connection to it and your love of it at an early age, and also that it was important that you had people in your life that would support you. In that I can imagine there are so many girls, in particular women of color and black girls more specifically, who are dissuaded from engaging in the material whenever you're open and ready. And so that has to be an important part of your story as well to get the support that you need to even be encouraged.

spk_1:   5:39
Yeah, I definitely I come from a family of teachers, and I definitely think that I benefitted from that even my mother's. My mother is an immigrant from Barbados, and her family basically came to the United States because even though her parents were both teachers and probably two of the best like educated people in their village, and the family basically didn't have enough to eat, and so they came to the United States. But, you know, her parents were teachers and bar baiters and took that very, very seriously. My mom became a teacher. My mom and actually both for siblings are all teachers. So all interesting at the point where I was born, my mom had already moved into being a full time organizer and primarily unpaid organizer and stayed home mother. So but I think that that was a really big influence for me, and I think it was a big influence for them that, like they came of age in the sixties in Brooklyn. My mom was 13. I was about to turn 13 when they came to the United States. And so I think that they understood very much the importance of education for black Children and creating opportunities for black Children. In fact, my mom was a volunteer for the Black Panther breakfast program in nursing home Roseville, which is where she taught when she graduated from from university. I think that that was a big piece event. I also think that actually, my cousin, who is the oldest member I'm one, I guess, Yeah, I don't know if he's the oldest member. I probably didn't think saying this on a podcast. I think older members of my generation of cousins was actually I'm He's a Franklin Pierce graduates in the University of New Hampshire law school. Yeah, so he's 10 years older than me. And so I also always had him ahead of me being very accomplished. And he was really, I think, really the first person in the family to go on to you like a professional degree, like a Ph. D M D J D type degree. And so I think that that seemed like a more reachable goal because I was seeing my cousin go off and do these really, really important things. But yeah, I think I was really lucky that I'm I don't think my mom is a women's rights organizer. So for her, there were no barriers. And in fact, I don't know. Maybe she felt like there was a political imperative to make sure that I knew that these were things I could dio

spk_0:   8:00
absolutely, and and so that had to inform your point of view as a feminist theorist as well. I can imagine it's part nature, but clearly part nurture yes as well. On some wondering how the the feminist lens through which you view your work your life personally professionally. How does that inform your work in researching and teaching in the physics and astronomy spaces?

spk_1:   8:27
I should start by saying that I think despite it maybe having an unusual kind of preparation in that my mother, Margaret Press God was like this huge like influence on me in terms of like my political thought and coming from an organizer family both on my mom's side and on my father's side that I went into university like, fairly naive about how gender dynamics and patriarchy like I just kind of thought sexism, patriarchy, misogyny. They were all like guys making inappropriate jokes and excluding women who should be included, like by saying or you shouldn't be in the room. And if it wasn't something really brazen like that, it wasn't really like I had new kind of concept of structural phenomena where there would be things that work where it wasn't people saying or doing things actively. If it systems in place to kind of lion black, it was really actually going through the process of earning of joint bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy and astrophysics and then going into a masters in astronomy and astrophysics and then really my PhD in physics. I would say, Unfortunately, my four years and that PhD program were like an incredible lesson in patriarchy, and I think like going through graduate programs and then entering into being a postdoctoral researcher I was forced to learn. And so I think where I benefited from, the training that I got for my mother was that I knew where to look. I had a sense of what direction to go in when I saw things. I I would say that even having grown up around her, I really didn't understand kind of how it would manifest in my life. I thought when I went t University that I would stand down a little bit. I had dreadlocks when I was for the first year and 1/2 of college, and so I thought maybe I was visibly gonna stand out, and I think I was a lot more aware that racism was gonna be a factor in my life. Rubin has a light skin person, but I didn't have an understanding of how our sexism and patriarchy would play a role. So from you, it was really becoming a physicist. Became part of my education. I've as a feminist theorist and and taught me the necessity of being a feminist. And I would say the way that I really bring it in is that it changes the way that I think about mentoring women in conversations in the office about Lake. You know, how are you giving that presentation? Keeping in mind that and it's absolutely not fair. But the moment you sound like you have questions about what you're doing on your research that I know for a fact, because I've heard so many stories about this and I've had it happen to me that people assume your incompetence in a way that they don't assume if a man raises a question about his work and so preparing people. And then I would say that I have learned a lot more about history of science. That may be your typical FAS assessed in. So sometimes I bring that into the classroom in the form of anecdotes like, Oh, this was actually part of a sleeve trading expedition that they went and looked at this eclipse, and that's part of the story.

spk_0:   11:38
That's a really important part of informing what you do and it it doesn't always require. And I'm thinking of my own methods of teaching and what I bring into the classroom as well that first of all, is a radical act. Ah, for me to just be in the in the classroom. I don't have to be on the diversity board, don't have to do all of the other things that I would ordinarily participate in, but just my presence alone, but the unique opportunity to bring other experiences into the classroom when I'm teaching pure doctrine, I don't have to stay within the four corners of a book. I don't have to read off of the page, but I use that as the beginning but provide the context of my own experiences. A black queer woman who is intellectual property lawyer but also creative and all of the other things. And just by mentioning including, it becomes a part of just the eco's of my class rather than the one day that's carved out for special attention. And I think that's really important and impactful, and I think that's a great way to approach the process of educating in any discipline by informing it with cultural references. Just as a matter of course.

spk_1:   12:52
Yeah, absolutely. You know, it's it's, I guess, to give an example in my stall arrester physics class last summer semester. So it was intrude astrophysics, but really making That's part of it. When your course, we mostly did stars at various planes. I'm a history nerd, so I just like to give, like, history anecdotes about everybody. So it's not just about like my Nora Thais people. It's not just about white women or black men or whenever in science, but like, if I think there's an interesting note, I'll tell you about it in class. And as I was preparing my lecturers and unusual in stars and the discoveries of pulsars, which are these neutron stars, they're basically stars that are primarily made of neutrons There. What happens at the end of a supernova basically is what let is left over is either a neutron star or a black hole. And there are these special ones that pulse because they basically are like a lighthouse. So they're rotating, and there's a beam of light that's coming out at a specific angle, and occasionally that beam turns in our direction. So it looks like a lake house. So it pulls is and this is why they're called pulsars. So the woman who first discovered these, Jocelyn Bell, was a graduate student and eventually her adviser went on to win the Nobel Prize for the discovery. And I realized, as I was writing my lecture, Newt's. I actually remember saying to my spires, No, I'm gonna have to tell them the story in class, and it's going to be terrible for the women's students to have to kind of hear the story. But given that might have it in this class is when there's an interesting historical Newt, I tell them, Here's how a discovery happened. I have to tell them this was something discovered by a graduate student and then her PhD advisor was given the price for it. So I think that's a really good example, which is that I didn't tell them anecdotes along the way. Like I was even telling them about the astronomical magnitude system and how it's actually tuned Teoh the way that the human eye works well, which I actually I had a student here stopped me in the middle of that discussion and asked me if I was making things up. Yeah,

spk_0:   14:59
which is part of the part of what you said earlier about being questioned about your

spk_1:   15:04
Yes, you said, Do you know what you're talking about? Are you just making things up? And you know when moments like that happened, you're also aware that for the women's students in the classroom, or maybe like aware of my activism and my viewpoint, they're watching me to see Can I handle the situation roller and my only you know, saying that these are things that I advocate for. But then when push comes to shove, I can't stand up for myself and at the same time, that student who is pushing me in that way, regardless of why I think that they're doing it, there's still a student in my classroom, and I do have to teach them that's

spk_0:   15:39
powerful. And that shows shows a centered nous and a mindfulness of your role and your presence there. And it's not about you. There's so many people who are reactive in the classroom and just toe hold the space and provide countless learning opportunities. Is actually really important. You either. Think thank you now. Thank you later. Thank you. Never. But what you're doing the good work out there so way help! You're enjoying this Addition of tech intersect. Our conversation will continue in a moment, but first, a word on an exciting opportunity. Tech Intersect Podcast is released to the public every Friday, but as an advantage Evans member, you'll receive first listen. Access and live tech Intersect connect video chats. Premium members also receive a copy of My E book, the Gen Xers Guy to up Skilling in a wet 3.0 world and unlimited access to the video chat replays and bonus in pursuit. My pro members, ready to leverage what they listen to and learn, receive access to the up Skilling self guided course and V I. P Group Coaching coughs so as you can see advantage, Evans membership adds substantial value to your podcast experience, and there are three ways to take advantage. See what I did right there? Of all that the tech Intersect podcast has to offer. So subscribe now and let's listen, learn and leverage together and now back to the conversation. Fantastic. So just as we can tell from the beginning of our conversation Identity recognition, certainly for me. And I suspect for you as well as a major part of off just how you move in the world both in real life and on social media with your digital representative and I'm always interested to know why is it intentional? Is it unintentional? Is it a mix of the two and and also the latter? Part of that is the origins of the hashtag black and stem, which I picked up a swell and used from time to time. But I actually don't know the origins of it.

spk_1:   17:55
Yes, sir. Black and Stone was created by Dr Stephanie Paige here. She's a black woman biochemist slash biophysicist. I don't really understand like byo anything. So don't ask me any questions about inner she. Most recently, she's been doing some research on relating to cancer. So doing important work. So she really she kind of started pushing this hashtag and she created in a current to go with it, and she hosts these like weekly discussions where people can kind of chime in on the hash tag about a specific topic, like she last some questions, and then people can respond and should retweets them. And I would say black and stuff is one of the reasons that I ended up becoming a heavy Twitter user was because I was meeting black scientists that I would have found in any other way. And I've developed a strong friendship with Stephanie because of that connection and with the mother black scientists. I'm Danieley is another example Ray Bourque's and there are other people. But, like as I'm listening, these air all black women who are doing different types of research from mine. But I really consider them part of my core of people that I can connect with when I have questions. Ray and Daniel have been faculty for longer than me. Yes, I've been getting a lot of really amazing advice from them about surviving. So I would say I have a lot of mixed feelings, particularly about Well, no, I'll say about Facebook and Twitter, and I think that Black and Storm is one of the reasons that actually it's hard to leave. Twitter is because of the community that exists there, and the way that you see that folks were younger than me are using social media that it's hard. Teoh abandon Twitter when you knew that they were there and they're looking for people who might be giving voice to things that they didn't know, it was okay to articulate about the criterion says as students of science,

spk_0:   19:55
right? Absolutely. And I guess your example earlier of being in a classroom. We can view in some oddly wonderful and horrifying way at the same time the experience of being on social media and using it as, ah, mechanism or tool to connect and inform and question and challenge and uplift and and all of those things. And you have a considerable following, so the absence would be not insignificant. I balanced that always with self care first, but in the same way that you're holding the space in your classroom on campus is the same way that I view your work online as well that you're constantly teaching that that's another platform of education, even though I know that you take a lot of shrapnel on you, take, you take a lot on social media. So maybe it's a Paul is, but not a complete departure. Yeah,

spk_1:   20:50
I mean, I definitely over the winter break. I took a couple of weeks off and they are quite a bit about what are the dynamics about it but the lake and the dynamics about it that I don't like? And then I came back. Teoh kind of an a terrible political movement for Jewish people and hasn't learned you for myself trying to navigate conversations that I felt were least with racism against black people in a lack of consideration specifically for people who were both black and Jewish like myself, and then had to weather a week of death threats because of that, and in order to be in conversation with university administrators about it and having to talk to my department chair about, like the emails and the voicemails that he's getting and, you know, having doesn't give out what pressure does this put on my science that my science has to be so excellent that when they're reading my tenure dossier there, remembering more of that than remembering the time that they got an email least with the N word in the K word, which is right, the kinds of things that we've been getting and so there's there's really the Cynthy very sharp edge to it particularly, I think if you have a large following and then I think there are these other kind of edgy parts that are maybe a little bit duller than that. But where people are making a lot of assumptions, if you have a lot of followers, why you have a lot of followers, whether you really love having a lot of followers. And I have to say I was not one of those people who sought to have a large following.

spk_0:   22:24
Great. I don't get that energy from you at all. You

spk_1:   22:27
know, I mean, and I think you know, honestly, I think everybody knew that I would probably make different language choices if that was I concerned for me. For me, If this is really I I think an anxiety I've always had. As a scientist, I'm an as even going back to when I was, you know, a 17 year old frosh and college was that I don't want to forget who I am because it has been if the Shiri to forget who I am from my appointed forgetting who I am also means forgetting values and responsibilities. Teoh the communities that need any of what I'm doing right now? Possible? Like my mom, my grandmother went to the merge on Washington. My mother sat on Brooklyn Bridge many times. At one point she sat down on Brooklyn Bridge with her sister because they were just tired. Everybody was marching across and they heard a voice behind them that was like, Sisters, why you sitting down? And my mom's have retired and they turned around and the guy said, You'll have to get on it E O turned around. It was Malcolm X. Wow. So I remember asking my mom like when you get tired, how do you keep going? And she tells me the story. But I think of that as like Malcolm X told my mother to get up, and she's still and through that I am also being told by him to get up. And so I don't feel like I have the option. I'm just saying, like I'm a success now. I have a PhD and have a nice position, and I have a nice home. I married I'm good, but that I have to understand that my success doesn't automatically translate into the success of everybody who needs more out of this world.

spk_0:   24:05
I'm glad that you first of all it's a tremendous story. Ah, felt chills as you said it. I didn't even know. I thought it was great that someone just said you have to get up. I didn't know. I you know, I didn't wait for the shout moment. That is tremendous. But I'm glad that informs your choices and decisions. And I'm glad that that buoys you in times when you feel like you just want to check out and go on with a well ordered life. So that says a lot about you. I'm interested. Also, let's talk about your forthcoming book. I know you're working on the disordered cosmos. Tell me why you're writing it. The impact that you hope that it has on others. And I asked because I reviewed a lot of your work at a very high level. I tend to fall down many a rabbit hole and you have a lot of wonderful rabbit holes in which to fall. But I see how you purposely and unapologetically engaged and all of the ways that we've talked about moving boldly forward, and I'm interested to know how that comes out in this type of writing as well. The

spk_1:   25:08
way that I'm thinking about it right now, I have to give credit. Teoh Darnel more who were a memoir about his life. And I think I'm hoping I'm not getting the title wrong. I think it's called in your Ashes and the Fire. Okay. It's about growing up and coming into adulthood and figuring himself out a za a black gay man from a working class family who is committed to social justice. And I interviewed him about the book and I asked him about the process of rating it, and he said that one of the nice things about writing the book with that it required him to sit down and think bigger and in terms of ah, longer to have just longer thoughts than you can have when you're just being reactive on social media. This is really kind of paraphrasing one of the things that he said to me, I

spk_0:   25:58
have to give him

spk_1:   25:58
a lot of credit for, really, I I'm not writing a memoir. My book is much more kind of a cross between essay collection and popular science, but definitely is about physics. It's about how race and gender and politics shape how physics is done, what we knew about physics, even the language that we use within physics. So that's kind of where the book is. I also tweeted today that my book is the worst friend that I've ever had. So I partly because I I'm I'm working through editing now, and I've realized that actually, I'm finding editing just, like, difficult to do, because I like the process of writing where I was just like rating one word after another. So it's like, really point in front of the other. I know have to kind of keep track of moving text around and cutting and pasting. But not having something accidentally be doubled, and it requires looking at. It's a lot more like moving from walking to choreographing a dance, which is the only thing I've done since I was in performing arts school when I was in like, elementary middle school. So I mean, it's been an interesting experience, I guess like the one thing I really want to say about it is that it's a book that I hope that if I could have put it in 16 year old China's hands when she was making decisions about where to go to college and trying to fortify herself for Harvard. If that was still the choice that she would make, which maybe we would have a conversation about that, how driving that it would give her something to get her through it in. Maybe, and we're empowered way than the way that I went through it. So I really wanted to pay for black girls who maybe aren't light their white classmates and physics, or for queer black girls who are, Maybe, Lay, I am a girl. But you know what? I am a girl because the world treats me like a girl. That's not how I feel on the inside, which has been my experience. So there is a chapter in the book about that and about how it's shaped. My life is a scientist. I think the hardest thing is that right now the draft of the book contains a chapter of art, sexual misconduct and science, and I felt I couldn't write about gender in a book on Science with Are Talking About Me too, right? I'm and that's a hard thing to think about young women having to read and at the same time, a friend of mine. He was unfortunately abused as a child said to me like Look, I would have valued a lot having a book that spoke to me about things that were happening to me and gave me a vocabulary for it.

spk_0:   28:40
That's powerful because it gives you the It would give that person that young girl, at whatever age that she was violated or abused, the sense that she's not alone and that there were options. And and to see yourself oneself differently in that moment transforms an entire lifetime without question. I hope that the impact you intend you have a soft voice, but you speak with a loud voice just because it's amplified in every space. I love that you're mindful of that, and I love that you are writing this book. I'm very interested in it, the creative side of my brain as a former performance poet and have other books, and I'm, you know, voracious reader at every stage of my life, less so now, some actually trying to restore myself by getting back to the origins of what gives me that sense of self in balance and it sounds like when you're working on is the sweet spot to that. And I can imagine that is quite therapeutic for you in this moment. To least I know my writing has been for me.

spk_1:   29:47
Yeah, I definitely I hope it has some kind of impact because otherwise, like, Why did they? What did I drag myself? My spouse and everybody

spk_0:   29:55
else's servant with your horrible friend? The book Read the manuscript. It

spk_1:   29:59
right, my horrible friend. The book. I guess one thing I'll say is that actually, I learned something about myself in the process, which I knew because I'm a particle cosmologist. I knew that I wanted to write about particle physics, but when I actually sat down to write about particle physics, my editor had said to me, You know what? You should just like, let yourself be weird. Tilbury writing these weird tweets about neutrinos like they sort of like we're Duke treats event new trainers, which are like these very light particles that for a long time, we thought actually were massless. But it turns out they have some kind of mass, but it's very small, and we don't understand them. I am. So I have been like reading these tweets. And she was like, You know, you should just think about writing a chapter that, like, let's yourself kind of do that. And I ended up going on this very long rant about quantum thermodynamics. And it was, Hey, it turns out I like quantum thermodynamics, which is the aspect of particle physics that governs quirks. If you forgive cork so courts. Neutrons are made of three quarks and protons are made of three quirks, so they're considered fundamental elementary particles, and you can see I'm create happy to tell you about these. The thing about that was realizing that these were the same particles that I was obsessed with in high school, reading a brief history of time, trying to tell my friends in the school bus about it. I didn't know anything about quirks, even though now my my understanding of science is enriched, and I've actually had an opportunity to open the box and look in the inside. I'm basically still that kid obviously works cool.

spk_0:   31:31
It's a full circle moment. How did that happen? See, there are no accidents in this universe. That's amazing. Well, I, um, in honor of your time and to be respectful of it, I see we're pushing up against the end of our time together. So I wanted to give you the opportunity to tell listeners how they can connect with you and your work.

spk_1:   31:54
Yes, I guess, Uh, right now, probably the best way to learn more about what I'm doing is to go to proft CPI w dot com That's my website. You can find me there. You can also find me on Twitter. I BG yongee. But actually, my turn is private right now, it's I think it's like, not very hopeful to advertise it, I but there there is a contact form on my website and I actually really like hearing, particularly from black parents who are trying to figure out how our Teoh encourage and support their Children who are interested in physics. So if I can't get back to you, I always if I'm seeing a pattern with the question that I'm getting a lot, I try and write a block entry. So you can also find me at medium dot com with the at symbol and then my first name, Chanda. I'm And that's where I blogged. And I encourage people to keep up with my black and also to keep up and get a subscription to the new scientist and read my monthly call him about particle physics and cosmology.

spk_0:   32:57
Excellent. I'm going to drop links to all of the relevant information in the show notes so that you can connect Doctor Chanda Prescott Weinstein. I appreciate you the work that you're doing. I love how you're moving through the world, and I'm happy to be along for the ride. So thank you very much for spending this time with me. Well, if I don't say so myself. This was an unapologetically dope conversation at the intersection of education, physics, astronomy, identity recognition and feminist theory. That's a lot all in one. But that is all in Dr Prescott Weinstein. And I'm really, really excited in great Paul that she took the time to speak with me so that I could share all that information with you. Dr. Prescott Weinstein is a Trailblazer, no doubt, and she leads by example, challenges assumptions and resists the status quo by being herself fully and with excellence. And she encourages us all, especially those like me, who proudly rep a black and stem identity. She wants us to boldly and unapologetically do the same. Now, remember, even though being yourself can sometimes come at a cost to your mind, your peace, your health relationships or job, do it anyway. Better to disappoint others than yourself. That's all. For now. Until next time continue to shine. Stay in touch with host Tanya Evans via your favorite social media on Twitter at at Tech Intersect and on Instagram via the handle Tech Intersect. This pie cast has been produced by Stephanie Renee for Soul Sanctuary Incorporated.